Teeth: Drink Water

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Even sugar free drinks such as diet soda or flavored mineral water, can damage tooth enamel. It's acidity, not just the sugar, causes decay. Plain water is the best beverage for your teeth. If you do sip soda, don't brush right after, which is bad for the softened enamel. Instead, rinse with plain water, then brush an hour later or chew sugarless gum to help neautralize the acid.

Food That Bight Bad Breath

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Recent studies show that eating 6 oz. of unsweetened yogurt everyday can reduce the level of odor-causing hydrogen sulfide in your mouth. The reason is that active cultures found in yogurt, compete with the bacteria in your mouth that contribute to bad breath. Accumulation of plaque and development of periodontal disease were also reduced in yogurt eaters. SO eat a cup of plain yogurt with active cultures and avoid varieties with added sugars. (Sugars allow bacterial growth)

Truth Behind Hookah Smoking

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2.3 million Americans smoke tobacco from pipes, and many of those who smoke water pipes, or hookahs, believe it is less harmful than cigarettes.  New research suggest hookah smoking is associated with serious oral conditions including gum disease and cancer. According to the World Health Organization, smoking a hookah is the equivalent to smoking 100 cigarettes, based on the duration and number of puffs in a smoking session. 

Valentines Day

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4 Bad Breath Foods to Avoid on Valentines Day

1. Alcohol & Energy Drinks :
According to the Men’s Health article, coffee, alcohol and the caffeine from energy drinks can be dehydrating.
Saliva acts as a natural defense to bad breath – among other oral health maladies – but when our mouths dry out from too much alcohol indulgence, saliva production obviously decreases.

2. Dairy :...
Stinky cheeses like Brie, Munster, Roquefort, & Limburger are some of the top bad breath foods on this planet, but —but milk and other dairy products don’t exactly make our mouths smell like that Valentine’s Day bouquet of roses either.

3. Candy :
Turns out candy doesn’t just rot our teeth—it also gives us bad breath.
It’s the combination of sugar and bacteria in our mouths that releases the smelly sulfur compounds, says Mallonee. And since candy particles are particularly sticky and tricky to remove, it increases the time bacteria and sugar can react.

4. Red Meat :
Who thought steak would actually be one of the most offensive bad breath foods?
Turns out the protein – which is a vital part of our diet – remnants in our mouths can produce quite the nasty smell, says Mallonee. Whereas other meats, like chicken or fish, won’t cause quite the same problem.

Parents Hoping Dental Stem Cells May Provide Treatment In Future

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KCNC-TV Denver reported that some parents are storing their children baby teeth,  hoping that the stem cells from these teeth may help treat diseases in the future. The article profiled a boy with type diabetes, who's dentist used a kit called store-A-Tooth to store four of the boy's baby teeth after the boy's mohter read about promising research using stem ells to find a cure

Five tips on how to use fluoride safely

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1. Start Early : As soon as a baby's first tooth emerges start brushing.

2. Drink tap water or bottled water with added fluoride : Fluoride in small amounts benefits developing teeth

3. Use the right amount : Commercial advertise using a swirl of toothpaste that covers the entire brush, but kids only need a fraction of that.

4. You can have too much of a good thing : Parents should take precaution to prevent accidental swallowing of too much toothpaste. Ingesting small amounts in NOT harmful but eating an entire tube can lead to fluorosis.

5. Stash it safely : Parents should treat toothpaste like any other medication and keep it out of child's reach.

Ray Mangigian, D.D.S. Lakewood Great Five Star Review by Shannon J.

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtY9w4SEj0c&feature=share

Annual Benefit Maximum

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The Annual Benefit Maximum of a dental insurance plan is the most benefit in terms of dollar amount you will receive ( the dental insurance company will pay out towards your claim) in the policy year of your policy. If you have unused benefits, these will not rollover!  In fact, dental insurance companies count on making millions of dollars off of patients who never use their insurance benefits. 

Annual Benefit Maximum

Posted by DrMangigian | Filed under

The Annual Benefit Maximum of a dental insurance plan is the most benefit in terms of dollar amount you will receive ( the dental insurance company will pay out towards your claim) in the policy year of your policy. If you have unused benefits, these will not rollover!  In fact, dental insurance companies count on making millions of dollars off of patients who never use their insurance benefits. 

Chewing Sugar-Free Gum May Contribute To Oral Health

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Chewing sugar free gum may reduce dental cavities because it traps bacteria and stimulates saliva production.  Thus, chewing gum may contribute to oral health.  A resent study found that gum trapped up to 100 million bacteria per piece!  This is about the same amount of bacteria removed after a thorough flossing.  Although chewing gum is not a substitute for flossing, gum after meals may still be beneficial for removing food particles and stimulating saliva production.